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20121201
20121231
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KQED (PBS) 165
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. that is how long u.s. lawmakers have to reach a deal or go over the fiscal cliff. for weeks, the combination of tax increases and spending cuts has been the ultimate political football in washington. there is little sign of any holiday good cheer. >> in washington, the fiscal cliff a stalemate remains. >> the latest on the fiscal cliff. >> the ugly phrase that is on everyone's lips, fiscal cliff, is what america could tumble off and 11 days. it means that if the president and congress cannot agree on a plan to sort out finances, there will be automatic savage cuts and brittle tax rises. neither side is budging much. >> it is very hard for them to say yes to me. at some point, they have got to take me out of it and think about their voters. >> four weeks, the white house said that if i move on rates, they would make substantial concessions on spending cuts and entitlement reform. i did my part. they have done nothing. >> it would mean automatic spending cuts worth more than a trillion dollars. taxes for the average household would go up by about three and a half thousand dollars. most economi
to fighting hunger in the u.s. as we work together, we can stamp hunger out. >> and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> for more information on tavis: please welcome at pbs.org. back to this program. -- please welcome wole soyinka back to the program. he is now a president -- a professor in residence, and he is the author of a new text, "of africa." >> thank you very much. tavis: you were tired of this nonsense that africans are inferior in a variety of ways. are we beyond that? >> i think it is an exaggeration to say that is why i wrote it. and number of reasons. it was to express my astonishment. it was totally mine blowing. i just mention that as one of the in ciliary -- one of the ancillary. i find a lot of crises tend to generate from east to west and cristian and islam. and there are what i call the invisible religions. lessons to teach the world. tavis: how do this to stand in their version religions play themselves out? >> yes, a very good question. look at somalia. look at more tanya. -- and more tanya -- look at another country. we would have t
has warned u.s. lawmakers, they have a duty to solve. we sat down with her here in washington. >> christine lagarde, the fiscal cliff, how concerned are they about the ramifications? >> people around the world are concerned about it. it appears to be the case there was more concerned about the eurozone than the fiscal cliff. now things have changed and there is more concerned about the fiscal cliff. they asked about a resolution. >> what could the impact speed? we are looking at a time when the global recovery is fragile at best. >> of u.s. is 20% of the global economy. if the u.s. suffers as a result of a fiscal cliff, a complete wiping out of its growth is going to have repercussions around the world. probably half of that. if the u.s. economy has less growth, it will probably be 1% less in mexico, canada, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in
$1.9 billion to settle u.s. allegations of money laundering. our chief economics correspondent has all the details. >> the largest bank in money- laundering, cartels washed through the bank. it resulted in a $1.9 billion fine, the biggest in u.s. banking history. the american authorities >> the corruption of the financial system by drug traffickers and other criminals, and free evading u.s. sanctions and law. >> they find $7 billion will be transferred between mexico and the u.s.. there were 25,000 transactions involving iran. in $290 million in suspicious traveler's checks were cleared by the bank. in a statement, they said they were story -- sorry for past mistakes. the former chairman was appointed as trade minister for david cameron. he had this to say when the allegations emerged in july. >> there were failures of the implementation, they expressed regret for that. it is a company i am proud to have worked for. >> they are not the only british bank to run these. the accusations of sanctions violations. other leading european banks have also in recent years reached settlements
. there was six adults pronounced dead at the scene. the shooter is deceased. >> u.s. networks say that the killer was a man and his 20's his mother was thought to be a teacher at the school. in washington, where the flag flies at half mast, barack obama addressed the nation as a president and a father. >> the majority of those who died today were children. beautiful little kids between the ages of 5 and 10 years old. they had their entire lives ahead of them -- birthdays, graduations, weddings, kids of their own. this among the fallen also teachers, men and women who devoted their lives to helping our children fulfill their dreams. our hearts are broken. >> he demanded meaningful action, a hint at perhaps tighter gun laws. that argument is for tomorrow. for now, america is trying to comprehend the how and why of the mass killings and a small rural community. new town was supposed to be a haven, a world away from the bustle of nearby new york. today, the elementary school was robbed of it and since joining colorblind and virginia tech of the grim roll call of loss. -- joining columbine and virgini
represented by the longshoremen's union and the u.s. maritime alliance are close to finalizing a new labor deal. so close, that they've extended the deadline on negotiations by another 30 days. this heads off a strike that could have begun on sunday, crippling 14 important ports. the possibility of a strike worried retailers, manufacturers, and farmers, and risked losses in the billions. >> susie: our next guest says once the fiscal cliff mess is resolved, there will be an explosion of mergers and acquisitions in 2013. he's robert profusek, chairman of the global m&a practice at jones day. so bob why you are so up beat about more mergers and being a acquisitions especially with everything going on with the fiscal cliff. >> it's a pessimistic time andtn the merger market. m & a has been fantastic. 9 market has been okay. it's not been at th terrible bus been good. it's been held back by the negativism that was focused on the eu and this year it's the fiscal cliff and the election and everything else. the conditions are there. we need more m. & a in this cup. >> you are saying they are notgt
less. >> warner: and we talk with ambassador marc grossman about prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. syrian state television showed >> woodruff: for more on all of this we turn to vitaly churkin, russia's ambassador to the united nations. thank you for joining us. let me begin by asking you about the comment today made by your deputy foreign minister mr. bog don november. he said today "it is impossible to exclude a victory of the syrian opposition." how would you describe
like u.s. consumers are doing what they do best in mid-decmber: procrastinating. how are you doing on your holiday shopping? >> pretty poorly to be honest with you. my wife typically takes care of most of it. last year, i was definitely ahead of the game. i'm probably 75% to 80% done. fantastic. haven't started yet. hoping to get a jump start on it this trip. >> reporter: retail expert mike niemira says only half of americans polled recently have finished their holiday shopping. >> the consumer is behind on their completion. that means we rely much more on the next few days for it to pick up dramatically. >> reporter: because of all the fiscal cliff doom and gloom, retailers are worried. and perhaps they should be. after all americans think their personal finances will take a hit next year. and that might mean fewer gifts under the tree. >> we believe that the post black friday lull that we've seen in the last three weeks that consumers are spending at a very restrained rate simply because they don't have the money and there's a little bit of a fear factor out there. >> reporter: b
prospects for afghanistan as the u.s. prepares to withdraw troops by 2014 and as he leaves his post as u.s. special envoy to the region. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. supporting science, technology, and improved economic performance and financial literacy in the 21st century. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: violence continued across syria today as the united states welcomed a russian admission that syria's rebels may succeed in overthrowing president bashar al-assad. we may have a problem with that tape and we apologize. we'll try and get it together. if we're not able to -- we're going to go ahead and interview right now mr. vitaly churkin. he is russia's ambassador to the united
. the u.s. is hardly alone -- u.b.s. is hardly alone in having to pay. >> caught trying to manipulate important interest rates and punished with 940 million pounds of fines and confiscation of ill-gotten gains. >> this is some of the most shocking behavior we have seen to date. this was prevalent across the firm for five years when people were seeking to manipulate an internationally used benchmark used for millions and trillions of pounds of contracts in order to benefit their own trading position. >> u.b.s. traders colluded with other firms in market rigging. one u.b.s. a banker said to a broker, let me do one humongous deal. i will pay $100,000, whatever you want. i am a man of my word. the bank has been punished by switzerland, the u.k., and the u.s. >> make no mistake. for u.b.s. traders, the manipulation of libor is about getting rich. as one broker told a derivatives trader, you are getting bloody good at this game. think of me when you are on your yacht in monaco, won't you? >> it is a 1 billion pound fine too much or too little or about right? >> it is not about the fine. wha
. at times when the u.s. grew the fastest was times when the population was also growing the fastest. so the fact there that there's a billion new consumers joining the middle-class in the next five or ten years, you bet be with them. the second is the cost of materials so basically in in the '90s oil was $15 a barrel for a decade. now it's $80 or $100 or $120. there's a massive amount of wealth that goes with where resources go and things like that that's number two. number see there innovation. where is is the innovation taking place? is it silicon valley? bangalore? other places. so i would say demographics, natural resources, where's the innovation? that's what rules. now, in the case of aviation -- let's take that business. revenue miles are growing 4% or 5% every year because people are flying around the world. but the three biggest airlines in the world today, if you went back ten years and if i said to you the three biggest airlines are going to be emirates and qatar airlines -- >> rose: you're losing it. >> completely in another -- well not american airlines and stuff like that.
week of january, the u.s. economy will be hit by $600 billion of automatic tax increases. and automatic spending cuts. the phenomenon known as the fiscal cliff. if that happens, it will trigger a recession, or worse. so, president obama is taking action and insisting that republicans agree to increase the existing marginal tax rates on the wealthiest top 2% of u.s. taxpayers. and of course, there is more to the deal. but there will be no negotiations on that big part of the deal unless that tax on the wealthiest 2% is negotiated now. the president could not be more emphatic in stressing the indispensable element of surmounting the cliff is that super-rich revenue. >> we're not insisting on rates just out of spite. or out of any kind of partisan bickering. but rather because we need to raise a certain amount of revenue. >> okay. here is john boehner, the republican house speaker. >> if you look at the plans that the white house have talked about thus far, they couldn't pass either house of the congress. >> republicans proposed raising $800 billion in extra revenues. and that revenue shou
will be waiting to see whether the central bank will do more to prop up the u.s. economy. the big question is whether the fed will stick with its so- called "operation twist" bond- buying program, or will it announce something new? erika miller takes a closer look at what's expected. >> reporter: the fed may announce a new twist in its bond buying plans, but that doesn't necessarily mean the stock market will shout. at it's final meeting of the year, the central bank is not expected to simply extend its operation twist program. that's the nickname for the fed's strategy of buying long- term treasuries and, at the same time, selling an equal amount of shorter-dated bonds. that's important because it keeps the bank's balance sheet the same size. now, the fed may be ready to do a new stimulus dance. >> under twist, they've been purchasing $45 billion longer term treasuries while at the same time selling $45 billion short term. they've pretty much run out of short-term stuff to sell, so i think they'll be continuing to purchase the long term, but purchasing outright, expanding their balance sh
the u.s. stock market will be the best performing stock market in the world. for details, john rogers joins us. he's c.e.o. of the cfa institute that conducted the survey. so john, the u.s. stock market ranked as the best performer. if we look at the charge of coming in in second place, china and brazil. why the vote of confidence considering all these concerns about the fiscal cliff? >> you're right, susie. it's interesting. it's a happy holiday season for investors. in the u.s. the stock market is going to have returned close to 13, 14%. and charter financial analysts around the world that we surveyed as you say feel pretty good about the prospects for next year. markets often do climb a wall of worry but in perspective we've had resolution of political uncertainty here in the united states. the new political leadership in china appears to be market friendly. we have avoided having southern europe slip into the mediterranean. and so also given other asset classes equities appear to be relatively attractive. >> let's talk about that, actually. because did you ask the people that you
to continue to improve through the end of next year, and he believes that rebound in prices will help the u.s. economic recovery. still ahead, the outlook for stocks in 2013, we're joined by wayne kaufman, he's the chief market analyst at john thomas financial. president obama is due back in washington tomorrow, cutting short his hawaiian holiday vacation. he will be meeting with congressional leaders for one last push to prevent the economy from falling over the fiscal cliff next week. no specific bill is on the schedule in the senate or the house, and house republicans haven't yet called their members back to washington. and hopes for a deal by the december 31 deadline are fading. darren gersh reports. >> reporter: the odds of avoiding the fiscal cliff did not get any better over the holiday. staff discussions continue, but there were few signs much, if anything has been accomplished. the house isn't even scheduled to return to washington yet, leaving it up to the senate to act. >> this is a senate that is incredibly divided, hopelessly partisan, requires 60 votes to do anything and somehow
head-on way than most countries. >> rose: including the united states? >> well, i think in the u.s. -- obviously you've got your own decisions to make about your fiscal problems and your issues and obviously your president and congress are engaging in that at the moment. but in the u.k. we have done that, we have got ahead of the curve and you can see in measures, for example, of how competitive the economies are, the you can is steadily becoming more and more competitive. >> rose: there's also this, the united states is engaged in this great debate that's going on in the white house with speaker of the house john boehner and the president of the united states, barack obama. what would be the optimal outcome of that debate as you look at it as a man who's dealing with the same kinds of problems? >> i'd say two things. one is we do need a resolution of this problem. i think the most immediate short-term problem facing the world economy-- i stress the word short term" is the u.s. fiscal cliff. i think if that is not resolved that is going to cause considerable problem for the world a
in america, half the in two. when in doubt, punt. >> the u.s. chamber of commerce represents the interests of more than 3 million businesses. small shops to large corporations. the 100-year-old chamber has offices and staff in every major city girdling the globe. now, regarding the fiscal cliff gridlock, what is the judgment of the chamber? answer. don't do anything now. punt. instead of lawmakers racing in the 14 days left of their lame duck session with christmas day in the middle of it, to implement spending cuts and tax hikes, the chamber says congress and the president should simply and temporarily extend the bush tax cuts across the board. punting will leave current tax policy and fiscal outlays unchanged. thereby wreaking no havoc on the economy and no gun at your head settlement. the newly elected congress comes in january, so any detante will have more legitimacy if it originates at the time of a new incoming congress rather than a lame duck departing one. question, what's the rational thing for our lawmakers to do? mort zuckerman. >> the rational thing, the grown-up thing, which,
business from what goes on in the u.s. economy? >> probably not. i'm bullish in the auto business and the building trades, but that is not going to be enough to offset the fiscal cliff, and we're going to have to manage europe at the same time. >> susie: let's say there is no deal and the u.s. economy really slows down, or as some people say could go into a recession, how are you preparing for that possibility? >> we're trying to make those investments that are strategic, and holding back on our hiring because we don't know the growth rates. we're probably looking at the different ways to reduce our points from a logical standpoint, and we're trying to pull every lever to give us some latitude and leverage. >> susie: what deal would you like to see come out of washington? what would be best for your company? >> probably making certain that the tax increases don't go all the way down to the middle class. i think we've just got to make sure the majority of people can still protect their me net pay right now. my biggest concern is -- what the government could do is make sure that the
,965. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3002. a number of automakers posted strong u.s. sales in november, among them chrysler, ford, and toyota. chrysler and toyota reported sales increases in the double digits, over a year ago. ford sales rose more than 6%, but g.m. reported only a 3% increase. volkswagen had its best november since 1973. in syria, the u.n. announced it is pulling out non-essential international staff for their own safety. those who remain will be restricted to the capital city, damascus. separately, the u.s. voiced mounting concern about activity at syrian government sites storing chemical weapons. this afternoon, president obama warned syrian leader bashar al- assad not to cross that line. oday i want to make it absolutely clear to assad and those under his command, the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. and if you make the tragic mistake of using these weapons, there will be consequences. and you will be held accountable. >> sreenivasan: in response, syria's government released a statement saying it would never use ch
headlines around the globe. conflicteteriorating -- concerns that the u.s. -- that the government will use chemical weapons. >> i want to make it clear that the world is watching. the use of chemical weapons is and would be totally unacceptable. >> centuries after ernest shackleton to the death defying journey, a new team is out to repeat the trip, minus any modern conveniences. welcome to our viewers on public television in america and also around the globe. it is an announcement many have been waiting for. today's news that the duchess of cambridge is expecting a child was greeted with delight and concern. from around the world, congratulations have been pouring in for the royal couple, including well wishes from the white house. the 30-year-old duchess is suffering from severe morning sickness. she has been hospitalized for several days. our royal correspondent starts our coverage. >> departing from hospital this evening, the father to be. william had spent several hours with his wife. they had driven to london earlier together. it was earlier this week and that the sickness st
, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: iran claimed today it has captured a u.s. surveillance drone. the "scan-eagle" is used to collect photographic and video images. iranian state television broadcast video of two military commanders examining the aircraft. they said it was seized "in the past few days," but they did not specify where or how. in response, the u.s. navy said none of its unmanned aerial vehicles-- u.a.v.'s-- are missing. and in washington, white house spokesman jay carney raised doubts about tehran's statements. we have no evidence that the iranian claims you cite are true. i'd refer you to the pentagon's comments this morning for details about this particular type of u.a.v., but again we have no evidence that the iranian claims are true. >> sreenivasan: a year ago, iran did manage to down a c.i.a. drone that apparently crossed the border from afghanistan. and last month, the u.s. military said another drone came under fire by iran over the persian gulf. it was undamaged. in afghanistan, a bomb blast has killed two nato troops in the country's so
, president obama announced tuesday that the u.s. will now formally recognize the syrian opposition movement. >> we've made a decision that the syrian opposition coalition is now inclusive enough, is reflective and representative enough of the syrian population, >> ifill: hours later, the friends of syria meeting in marrakech, morocco took the same step. the u.s. became one of 114 nations to endorse the syrian national council created just last month under international pressure. deputy secretary of state william burns: >> in a growing number of towns and villages, a new syria is being born, the regime of bashar al assad must and will go, the sooner he steps aside the better for all syrians. >> ifill: despite showing signs last week of a possible shift in russia's position, the decision did not go down well in moscow, which opposes outside action against the assad regime. foreign minister sergei lavrov: >> ( translated ): as the coalition has been recognized as the only legitimate representative, it seems that the united states decided to place all bets on the armed victory of this very nati
the u.s. diplomatic mission in libya. >> we have to do better. we owe it to our colleagues who lost their lives in benghazi. we owe it to the security professionals who acted with such extraordinary heroism that awful night to try to protect them, and we owe it to thousands of our colleagues serving america with a great dedication every day in diplomatic posts around the world. >> brown: spending versus saving: amid the last-minute holiday rush, paul solman weighs the economic benefits. >> holiday season grand central terminal and a key question: is consumerism kind of a bad thing that's overdone this time of year? or is it the key driving economic and moral force in our society? >> suarez: and we close with another in our series of interviews with newly elected congressional members. tonight, north dakota's senator- elect, democrat heidi heitkamp. >> brown: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the alfred p. sloan foundation. suppor
, forcing program elimination or backfilling." as the tax hikes and spending cuts approach, u.s. manufacturers saw business shrink last month. the institute of supply management's purchasing managers index fell unexpectedly to 49.5, down from 51.7 in october. a reading below 50 means business has fallen back into contraction. the november statistic is the lowest since july 2009. the dow fell 60, the nasdaq down eight, the s&p 500 lost six. >> susie: jeff saut says investors seem to be ignoring bad news, and this is a bullish sign. he's managing director and chief investment strategist at raymond james. so jeff, not only are you bullish but you're also calling for a pretty decent santa claus rally. tell us why? >> well, i have learned over the 42 years in this business, susie, that it's pretty tough to put stocks to the downside in the ebullient month of december. i mean it's happened but it's a pretty rare event it just seems to be the holiday sentiment tend to its lift stocks. i think that is what will happen this kror because i'm not one that thinks we'll fall totally off the
conversation and clearly sub optimal from the u.s. economic perspective. so when unemployment starts to rise, it tends to be persistent and gain momentum and we want to try to avoid that at almost any cost so this is something that, even if we hit 9%, they would clearly be recessionary if we were talking about than the six months from now. >> and what about the economic status of the u.s.? in the world? there's been a lot of talk about a downgrade of the u.s.' credit rating. do you see that happening? and what would that mean? >> well, it clear has has happened in the past from s and p and it could very happen through moody's. i think it's symbolic of the long-term structural imbalances that we need to address clearly as a nation. we are still however, susie, as clearly, you and i know, still the locomotive engine of the world despite china and other emerging rising markets and that has been clear the past two years, where europe is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly con
profiles chinese artist and dissident ai wei wei, whose work is on exhibit in the u.s. for the first time. >> if we can change ourselves, that means part of society will change. if more people can do so, then we can change the society. >> woodruff: and we look at what the federal trade commission calls a "digital danger zone," mobile applications that gather data about children. >> what needs to be done is a way for parents to easily at any time see exactly what's being collected and who they are sharing that information with. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> woodruff: michigan, a s
24 years in u.s. senate. >> there is reason for people to be angry skeptical and cynical about the willingness or capacity of congress to act or stop mass violence in our country. >> woodruff: and kwame holman remembers conservative jurist former solicitor general and failed supreme court nominee robert h. bork. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: >> support also comes from >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: the school shootings that shook the nation sparked a new call to action at the white house today. the president vowed to have proposals ready for the new congress that convenes next month. somber scenes of mourning played out once again today in newtown, connecticut. while in washington, president obama walked into the white house briefing room named for james brady-- the press secretary criticall
to burst in shanghai. our top story, the leader of the democratic majority in the u.s. senate says politicians are running out of time to avoid the budget crisis known as the fiscal cliff. every reed said democrats and republicans had to stop squabbling to have any chance at which an agreement by december 31st and higher taxes and spending cuts will automatically take effect. president obama has cut short his holiday to revive the talks. >> if we go over this cliff, the house of representative with four days left are not here with the speaker having told him that he will have 458 hours' notice. i cannot imagine their conscience out there wherever they are around the country and we are trying to get something done. >> why is the american economy teetering on the edge of the cliffs? these are some of the things that president obama is trying to prevent with the return to the lighthouse. an employment has fallen to a four year low and currently stands at 7.7%. no deal could mean 2.1 million jobs disappearing parent to it would equate to a contraction of 1.5% in the value of all goods
will report it's monthly snapshot of the u.s. labor market. it, too, is likely to reflect temporary effects related to the aftermath of hurricane sandy. >> we're looking for only a 50,000 gain in jobs in november, well under that 170,000 average we've seen over the past three months. >> reporter: hurricane sandy's effects on hiring may be short- lived, but experts worry fiscal cliff concerns could result in a new storm brewing for workers looking to land a job in the coming weeks. suzanne pratt, "n.b.r.," new york. >> tom: citi and the financials lead the way higher on wall street, helping the dow top 13,000 again. but a big drop in apple shares kept the nasdaq from gains. by the closing bell, the dow was up 82 points, the nasdaq down 23, the s&p added two points. >> susie: investors were also encouraged by news that american workers were very productive this past summer, and that's good news for company profits. productivity increased at its fastest pace in two years, at an annual rate of 2.9% from july through september. that number blows away the initial estimate of 1.9%. erika miller ta
administration and that was in syria. the u.s. stepped up missile defense along syria's border with turkey, hoping to stave off the potential use of chemical weapons against anti-assad rebels. for the first time the u.s. is formally recognizing rebels' attempt to overthrow president assad and we are at the end game, or are we? martha? >> i think we're closer then we have ever been certainly. i think even two weeks ago there were a lot of people saying this could be months and months and months. we have no idea when this will end. but i think if you look at where those rebels are advancing in damas cass, i think it really could end there. you've got suburbs. you're seeing this extraordinary video coming out of damascus with the suburbs virtually on fire. the thing i think is most frightening about this is everybody, the rebels, regime, everybody is just trying -- destroying everything in their path. then you get into the terrible thing with retribution. you have rebels advancing. you have regime fighting back. but i think asan has to be feeling the pressure. i think he's probably moving fro
be a net buyer because the economy next year is likely to be a bit better next year here in the u.s. and globally. >> susie: we saw that treasury yields rose, and is this a signal to get out of treasures and to put your money into stocks? this has been a safety area for most investors. >> it sure is. i bought a bond and it went up, and why do you want to take this away from me. but i believe in the premises of your question. if, in fact, the economy is a little better, and the financial risks are a little better, that's a recipe for very low interest rates, for a mild increase in interest rates, which means bond prices go down. i would not be overweight in the treasury area. i would have modest weights and have the rest made up in equity, susie. >> susie: bob, thanks a lot. we look forward to your 10 predictions in 2013. we'll be talking to you about that. robert doll as nuveen as asset management. >> susie: there was a new twist today in the samsung-apple saga over patent disputes. samsung electronics dropped a critical lawsuit banning the sale of apple products in europe. the good
nearly 40,000 gallons a day. it's one of the largest employee-owned paint operations in the u.s. part of a $13 billion industry domestically. 140 workers in the 15 acre san carlos facility, 1,500 world wide, including 150 retail outlets in seven states. >> we own currently 58% of the stock and the rest of the stock is owned by the moore family. >> mike: you like white? they got it. you like -- they got that, too. >> still seeing a lot of reds. that teal is slipping into it. teal and turquoise. green still kind of there still. yellows, yellow influence, neutrals are still there. but the teals and the reds and oranges. oranges are just really popular right now, too. >> i started off with. >> mike: steve devoe is chairman and c.e.o. of the 66-year-old company. he does not paint a pretty picture of what they and every other paint manufacturer has been through over the last couple years. what he does do is point out why kelly moore fared better than most. first, history. they have it. started in 1946 by bill kelly and william e. moore, the goal was simple: make a quality paint that profess
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 165 (some duplicates have been removed)